Thanks to the Wellness Almanac for Giving Invasives Their 5 Minutes of Fame! (and PS don’t forget the Gates Lake community weed pull on Saturday May 25 to remove invasive burdock!)

a guest post by Sea to Sky Invasives

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What an eventful first week it has been for the team here at Sea to Sky Invasive Species Council(SSISC)! For those of you reading this, you’ll know that The Wellness Almanac has been doing Instagram takeovers, letting locals along the Sea to Sky Corridor share a slice of what life is like for them in beautiful BC and the team here was lucky enough to be a part of that.

SSISC is a local environmental non-profit that works to minimize the threat of invasive species that impact the environment, the economy and human health in the Sea to Sky corridor. Our team is made up of two main parts, the Field Crew and the Education and Outreach team. The guys (and gals!) on the Field Crew are the ones that actually go out into the field, find out where the invasive species are growing and build a plan to control them. The Education and Outreach Team is who you’ll see at farmer’s markets, stopping by schools, training local businesses, hosting community weed pulls and taking over Instagram accounts!

We would like to start off by first saying a big thank you to The Wellness Almanac for letting us take over Instagram for the week. It was especially fitting because May is BC Invasive Species Action Month, so what better way to celebrate than to spread our message to a brand new audience! We were really excited to showcase what a day in the life of a SSISC staff member is like and to bring you along for our first week on the job. We’re always looking for different ways to reach out to local businesses and individuals interested in learning more about invasive species, so don’t hesitate to get in touch!

Being able to share what we’re all about was great and hopefully we’ve sparked some interest throughout the week.

Many people don’t know that many plants and animals that you see in our area aren’t actually native to the Sea to Sky Corridor. Often you’ll see Canada Thistle or Orange Hawkweed, to name a couple, and not give it a second thought because it’s not common knowledge that plants like these are actually invasive. Our aim is to educate the public to not only be on the lookout, but to know what to do if you come across an invasive. The only way to stop the spread is to get more people involved so that we can minimize the number of invasive species and keep our beautiful landscapes #invasivefree.

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