Stucum Wi: walking with wisdom

As I typed this, Dr Lorna Williams was in Regina giving a talk to the Canadian Linguistics Association, and receiving a National Achievement Award. I hope they recorded her speech. Because, after just a few enriching conversations, I sought out more of Dr Williams’ insight and found gems in every online speech or book. It would be amazing to see it all collated into one place – because there’s not enough of Lorna herself to go around, even though she’s doing a pretty good job of travelling the country and sharing her knowledge and perspective.

Back in the spring of 2010, she presented the keynote and closing speech to the Network of Performance Based schools Going Deeper seminar, and this is where I learned the phrase Stucum Wi, which I will be borrowing, frequently.

“I titled this talk Stucum Wi, Walking with Wisdom.

Stucum in my language is a very special word. It’s a word that is rarely used today, but I’ve always loved this word. Stucum is what people would say to each other when someone was going on a journey and so I chose this word to introduce the idea.

Because Stucum Wi, the translation of the word, means to let the creator help you see your path.

This idea, of giving yourself to a world beyond yourself, is, I think, really important. Because, as humans, because we have such a wonderful brain, we think that it can do everything. But it’s important that we remind ourselves that we need help. Asking, acknowledging that we cannot, sometimes we think we see the path, but sometimes we need help to see really what the path is, denotes a sense of humility, and I think that’s important when we’re walking together.”