Chicken Coops are the avian version of the Tiny House movement – trending in a big way, according to John Tschopp’s latest update

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I sat down with John Tschopp earlier this year – he and his neighbour had had a close encounter with a hawk that got entangled in the wire of a chicken coop on New Year’s Day, and we figured that my column needed a bit more bloodshed and drama.

I’ve been gleefully receiving John’s birding updates for several years now, and sharing many of them here on the Wellness Almanac – in fact, sharing so many that I’ve pretty much created his digital tattoo. “I had a potential customer Google me,” laughed John, who has operated the Beaverlodge Machine shop for 30 years. “He told me, ‘All that came up was a bunch of birds.'”

Last week, John shared another tale of avian hijinx from the Pemberton Valley – suggesting that chicken coops are the avian version of the Tiny House movement – trending amongst bird species in a serious way.

(Or more gruesomely, it’s probably apt to compare chicken coops with McDonald’s drive thru…)

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Over to John:

Robin and Steve Black do more than just keep us on the road on good tires. They also run a farm at the north end of Pemberton Meadows, at the end of the public highway.

As on any respectable farm, there is a well stocked chicken coop.

Two months ago, a big commotion had Robin check on her chickens.

What she found was a Big Horned Owl killing chickens.

The owl was very lethargic, barely able to fly.

Robin and Steve were able to confine the owl and the bird was admitted to OWL in Surrey.

In the care of the people at the rehab facility the big bird recovered very nicely.

Today (January 27 2017) was the happy day for the Big Horned Owl to return to its familiar woods.

A relay of volunteers arranged the transport from Surrey to Pemberton.

I was tolerated to watch the release with my camera.

 

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