Open a window and let the “nowness” in

In September, a British doctor who specializes in palliative care, wrote this op ed for the New York Times. I kept returning to the image of the 51 year old woman with untreatable breast cancer listening to birdsong outside her window, realizing as she tuned in to its cheery tune, that it was okay. She didn’t have to grasp so hard, struggle so much, to document her every minute, her disappearing life.

in life's last moments open a window

I realized that most of my digital clutter – most of my clutter in general – is this attempt to shore up the battens against my own mortality.

Dr Clarke writes:

In the hospice where I work, I am often struck by the intense solace some patients find in the natural world.

I met Diane Finch, a patient, in May, on the day her oncologist broke the devastating news that further palliative chemotherapy was no longer an option. She was 51. From that point on, her terminal breast cancer would run its natural course, medicine powerless to arrest it.

“My first thought, my urge, was to get up and find an open space,” she told me on that first meeting. “I needed to breathe fresh air, to hear natural noises away from the hospital and its treatment rooms.”

At first she fought to preserve herself digitally, documenting every thought and feeling on her computer before they, and she, were lost forever. But one day, as she was typing frantically, she heard a bird singing through her open window.

“When you come to the end of your life, you get the sense that you don’t want to lose yourself, you want to be able to pass something on,” she told me later. “When I had whole brain radiotherapy, I felt as though something had dropped out, as if everything I said needed to be saved. It was all running away from me.

“Somehow, when I listened to the song of a blackbird in the garden, I found it incredibly calming. It seemed to allay that fear that everything was going to disappear, to be lost forever, because I thought, ‘Well, there will be other blackbirds. Their songs will be pretty similar and it will all be fine.’ And in the same way, there were other people before me with my diagnosis. Other people will have died in the same way I will die. And it’s natural. It’s a natural progression. Cancer is part of nature too, and that is something I have to accept, and learn to live and die with.”

Ms. Finch recorded a song based on the peace she felt listening to the bird song, and it was enough to bring her some relief from what — up to that point — had been almost feverish efforts at self-preservation.

Another patient, whom I admitted in July with about a week to live, was mostly concerned that I keep the windows open, so that he could “keep on feeling the breeze on my face and listening to that blackbird outside.” I rushed to make sure of it.

Shortly before his death from pancreatic cancer at 59, in the 1990s, the British playwright Dennis Potter described the exaltation of looking out at a blossom that had become the “whitest, frothiest, blossomest blossom that there ever could be” from his window.

“Things are both more trivial than they ever were, and more important than they ever were, and the difference between the trivial and the important doesn’t seem to matter. But the nowness of everything is absolutely wondrous,” he told an interviewer.

People often imagine hospices to be dark and dismal places where there is nothing left to experience but dying. But what dominates my work is not proximity to death but the best bits of living. Nowness is everywhere. Nature provides it.

Photo by Shayla Wallace

2 thoughts on “Open a window and let the “nowness” in

  1. dianezaste says:

    The first time I was diagnosed with cancer, there seemed no space able to contain the amount of processing I needed to do. On the way home from the doctor’s office, I had my husband pull the car over & I jumped into nature to walk the rest of the way home. It was in the woods that pressure valve released & I was able to fully breathe out the fear & confusion while feeling the ground beneath my feet – ground that had seemed to fall out from beneath me – ground that could absorb what I could not fully integrate all at once. The air absorbed my hyperventilation as I slowly walked back into my life.

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